Magna Carta Found In Scrapbook May Be Worth Millions

CNN Just days after four Magna Cartas were united for the first time in 800 years at the British Library in London, another ancient version of the document has been discovered by chance in a medieval coastal town in England. Mark Bateson, an archivist in Sandwich, southern England, found the previously unknown version of the Magna Carta — which established the principle that everybody, including the king, was subject to the law — after historian Nicholas Vincent had asked him to look for a separate document dealing with a local forest that he was researching. After rummaging through a scrapbook of council archives, Bateson found the Forest Charter, a document issued by King Henry III in 1217, as well as a tattered page that he thought looked like the Magna Carta. Making of the Magna Carta 01:18 PLAY VIDEO 800 years old, the Magna Carta rings as true as ever 01:05 PLAY VIDEO Magna Carta: Manuscripts united to mark 800th anniversary 8 photos EXPAND GALLERY “He wasn’t really aware of the fact that they were either rare or that this one was indeed what it purported to be. I think, from his point of view, it was all a bit of a shock,” said Vincent, professor of medieval history at the University of East Anglia. But he says there is no doubt that this is a version of the Magna Carta, or “The Great Charter,” that was published in 1300 under the reign of King Edward I. The original document was issued by England’s King John in 1215. The document is badly damaged, with a third of its text and the royal seal of Edward I missing and the back of it firmly stuck down. But despite its deformities, Vincent said it could fetch millions. “It [the damage] probably would interfere with the value of it if someone were foolish enough to sell it,” he said. “But I think there’s no question of that. “This one is in nothing like the condition of the one that went for sale in New York [in 2007, for $21.3 million] but I would say it’s certainly worth in the millions rather than in the tens and hundreds of thousands. And as a pair, they are all the more desirable.” And other discoveries have been made as well. “The fact that they [Magna Carta and Forest Charter] are both there in Sandwich is particularly interesting because there is no royal forest in Kent. That really tells us something that we really didn’t know before about the way that the document was published,” Vincent said. “And given that this is the most important document in English history, people make such a fuss about...

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Laredo Phil ‘Lite’ Concert 7 P.M. Friday At TAMIU
Jan30

Laredo Phil ‘Lite’ Concert 7 P.M. Friday At TAMIU

Special to the Laredo Sun Start your weekend with a short concert by the Laredo Phil Friday, Jan. 30 at 7 p.m. in the Texas A&M International University (TAMIU) Center for the Fine and Performing Arts Recital Hall. General admission is only $10 and free for students with a valid ID. “Friday Nite Lites” was conceived by Brendan Townsend, TAMIU assistant professor and music director, Laredo Phil, in an effort to present a concert program that would not exceed an hour. The program consists of five short pieces and opens with the title march from the 1954 movie, “The Dam Busters,”  followed by three unique works for soloist and orchestra. Violinist Emily Osinski will perform the flashy and highly entertaining “Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso” by Saint-Saens. Next is her husband William, brass instructor, Laredo Community College, with Persichetti’s “The Hollow Men.” Finally, 16-year-old cellist from Dallas, Alex Davis-Pegis, will play the 1st movement of Shostakovich’s Cello Concerto No. 1. The concert closes with a work written by Townsend’s father, Dr. Declan Townsend, “Aisling – A Fantasy for Orchestra.” For more information, contact Townsend at...

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Government Stays Open As Congress Advances Poison-Pill Spending Bill
Dec12

Government Stays Open As Congress Advances Poison-Pill Spending Bill

The Huffington Post WASHINGTON — At least Democrats will have eggnog to wash down the poison pills they swallowed on Thursday as the House narrowly passed a government funding bill that will let Congress go home early for Christmas, and give Wall Street a fresh gift. The House barely passed the inelegantly named “cromnibus” appropriations bill after President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) were forced into an unlikely alliance against rebellions from both parties, primarily led by the “Elizabeth Warren wing” and House Democrats. The bill, which passed 219 to 206, will keep the government running until next September. But only 57 Democrats voted for the bill, and 67 Republicans broke ranks with their party to oppose it. Some Republicans didn’t think the measure was conservative enough. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and most of her colleagues, meanwhile, were bitterly opposed to two attached riders that would whittle away at campaign finance rules and roll back provisions in the Dodd Frank Wall Street reform act designed to curb the risky trading at the heart of the 2008 financial crisis. Pelosi nearly torpedoed the $1.1 trillion measure during a procedural vote Thursday morning, when all her members and 17 Republicans opposed a rule that set the terms of debate on the measure. A similar coalition balked later at final passage, which was supposed to occur around 2 p.m., forcing House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) to delay a final vote until after 9 p.m. Pelosi marshaled her caucus against the bill even after the White House urged support. The administration said the bill “provides certainty,” even though it did not like the Wall Street gift. But Pelosi savaged it is a scathing floor speech. “This is ransom, this is blackmail,” Pelosi said. “We don’t get a bill unless Wall Street gets its taxpayer-funded coverage.” The controversial provision lets taxpayer-insured banks conduct the sort of derivatives trading that Dodd-Frank barred them from engaging in after the 2008 financial meltdown. Compliance has repeatedly been delayed, however, and was not set to kick in until next summer. The other provision that sparked Democrats’ ire was a change to campaign finance rules that lets wealthy donors dramatically boost contributions to party committees. White House spokesman Josh Earnest argued that the bill does more good than bad, and that it represented compromise for the GOP, which initially wanted to gut the Affordable Care Act and Obama’s executive actions on immigration. “This is the kind of compromise that the president’s been seeking from Republicans for years now,” Earnest said in an appearance on MSNBC. But to Democrats, it looked like the GOP had...

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Inside Duchess Kate’s 1st Day In NYC
Dec08

Inside Duchess Kate’s 1st Day In NYC

ABC News Duchess Kate is out and about in Manhattan. The pregnant Duchess of Cambridge, accompanied by the first lady of New York City, Chirlane McCray, wife of Mayor Bill de Blasio, first visited Harlem’s Northside Center for Child Development, an organization that provides mental health services and more to children. After that, she was set to attend a luncheon, while her husband, Prince William, continued his visit to Washington, D.C. On this visit, the royals are “doing a number of things to support charities they really care about — disadvantage[d] young people, mental health, illegal wildlife trade, which is something they have worked on in the past,” British Ambassador Sir Peter Westmacott told ABC News previously. Meanwhile, Prince William, who met with President Obama this morning, was set to attend the International Corruption Hunters Alliance conference this afternoon. It’s a cause dear to his heart: His charity, United for Wildlife, has been dedicated to fighting against the ivory market. Tonight, the royal couple will reunite to watch the Brooklyn Nets take on the Cleveland Cavaliersat the Barclay’s Center in Brooklyn, New...

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223 Arrested As Protesters, Police Clash In New York City Over Eric Garner Decision

ABC News New York City Police arrested 223 people in overnight protests, the second consecutive night of demonstrations in opposition to a grand jury’s decision not to indict officers in the choke hold death of Staten Island man Eric Garner. Many of the arrests involved charges for disorderly conduct or refusal to clear the streets, authorities told ABC News. John Minchillo/AP Photo PHOTO: Protestor Rayyan Ali cries as her protest group occupies Herald Square Dec. 4, 2014, in New York, in response to a grand jury’s decision not to indict the police officer involved in the death of Eric Garner. The protesters gathered in downtown Manhattan’s Foley Square and chanted “I can’t breathe” and “No justice, no peace” before marching across the Brooklyn Bridge, carrying replicas of coffins. Another group started in Harlem. The marchers also disrupted traffic near the Holland Tunnel, the Manhattan Bridge and on the West Side Highway. Eric Garner Case: NYPD Officer Not Indicted in Choke Hold Death WATCH: Obama After Eric Garner Decision: ‘This Is an American Problem’ PHOTOS: See Public Reaction to No Indictment in Eric Garner Choke Hold Death A brief clash was reported between protesters and police in Times Square, but the situation was brought under control. Jason DeCrow/AP Photo PHOTO: Protesters rally against a grand jury’s decision not to indict the police officer involved in the death of Eric Garner in Foley Square, Dec. 4, 2014, in New York. Some of the protesters voice their feelings using attire. John Minchillo/AP Photo PHOTO: Protesters occupy Herald Square during march, Dec. 4, 2014, in New York, against a grand jury’s decision not to indict the police officer involved in the death of Eric Garner. The grand jury’s vote not to bring an indictment in Garner’s death – along with a similar outcome to the August police shooting of unarmed black teen Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri – has brought national unrest, with demonstrations in cities such as Washington, D.C., Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, Detroit and Denver. Jason DeCrow/AP Photo PHOTO: Protesters rally against a grand jury’s decision not to indict the police officer involved in the death of Eric Garner in Foley Square, Dec. 4, 2014, in New York. Civil rights leaders are hopeful about a forthcoming federal investigation into Garner’s death, but said reform is needed. At a news conference in New York after a night of protests led to 83 arrests, the Rev. Al Sharpton called the state-level grand jury system “broken” when it comes to police brutality cases and urged federal authorities to fix it. “The federal government must do in the 21st century what it did in the mid-20th...

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Former Vikings Safety Orlando Thomas Dies At Age 42 After Battle With ALS

CNN Former Minnesota Vikings safety Orlando Thomas, who earned an All-Pro selection as a rookie in 1995, died Sunday after a long battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. His agent, Mark Bartelstein, confirmed the news to ESPN’s Adam Schefter. He was 42. “Nobody’s ever fought a battle like Orlando fought, with so much dignity—I never saw anything like it,” Bartelstein told Schefter. “It’s just incredible. He never had a sense of self pity, never felt sorry for himself, he was always worried about everyone else. He was just the most incredible person I’ve ever been around.” The Vikings also released a statement on the team website: The Vikings are deeply saddened by the loss of Orlando Thomas. Orlando was an outstanding player for the Vikings for seven years, but more importantly, he represented the franchise and the state of Minnesota with the utmost dignity and class. While his outgoing personality made him a favorite among his teammates, Orlando’s involvement in the community made him a favorite outside of Winter Park. Since 2007, Orlando fought this disease with tenacity and optimism. Throughout his difficult battle, he refused to allow ALS to define him, instead putting others’ needs in front of his and focusing on making those around him smile. Orlando will always remain a member of the Minnesota Vikings family. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his wife Demetra and their family. A second-round pick out of Louisiana-Lafayette (then called Southwestern Louisiana), Thomas emerged as a star during his rookie season. He led the NFL with nine interceptions and made 41 solo tackles despite starting only 11 games, earning an All-Pro berth as one of the few positives on a shaky Minnesota defense. Over the next half-decade, he became a fixture in the back of the Vikings secondary, though his career peaked early. After intercepting 14 passes in his first two NFL seasons, Thomas picked off eight over his last five. Danny Moloshok/Getty Images He retired following the 2001 campaign while still only 29 years old. In 98 career games (82 starts), Thomas had 22 interceptions and 350 solo tackles. He is one of seven people in Louisiana-Lafayette history to have their number retired. Three years after his retirement, he was diagnosed with a disease that would abruptly change his life. He spent the last decade battling ALS, a debilitating degenerative disease that slowly takes away motor and communication functions. By this past August, when Tim Buckley of The Advertiser profiled Thomas, he was unable to communicate without the help of his wife, Demetra, and was being kept alive by a ventilator. “There can’t be a more-maddening disease than this,” Bartelstein told Buckley. “Because your mind moves perfectly, and everything else just slowly, slowly comes to a...

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