$4.1 Verdict Against R&L Carriers in Texas Crash
May05

$4.1 Verdict Against R&L Carriers in Texas Crash

http://www.truckinginfo.com/ A 41-year-old Mississippi woman, seriously injured when her pick-up truck rolled over, after it was rear-ended by an 18-wheel tractor-trailer driver on a Texas interstate highway in 2011, was awarded $4.1 million by a Dallas, Texas jury. The jury ruled late last Thursday that the truck driver, who had two previous rear-end collisions, was grossly negligent, according to a release from the plaintiff’s attorney, Fitts Zehl LLP, based in Houston. The jury also found his employer, Greenwood Motor Lines, doing business as R&L Carriers, was also grossly negligent in failing to properly supervise and train the driver. The collision happened near Weatherford, Texas on I-20 on the evening of Dec. 5, 2011, seriously injuring Bobbie Bush. The truck driver was estimated to have been traveling at least 65 mph at the time of the collision, according to Bush’s...

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Laredo CBP Officers Seize $1.1 Million in Meth and Marijuana, Driver Arrested
Apr30

Laredo CBP Officers Seize $1.1 Million in Meth and Marijuana, Driver Arrested

Laredo, Texas –U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Laredo Port of Entry this week seized a combination load of methamphetamine and marijuana valued at $1.1 million during a routine vehicle examination. “Our officers employed an effective combination of inspections experience and technology to seize a combination load of narcotics,” said Jose Uribe, Acting CBP Port Director, Laredo. “Seizures like these reinforce the border security aspect of mission and keeping our communities safe from the scourge of street-level narcotics.” The seizure occurred on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 when CBP officers working at the Lincoln-Juarez Bridge encountered a 1995 Ford Econoline van driven by a 30-year-old Mexican citizen from San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. CBP officers referred the driver and vehicle for a secondary examination. During the examination, CBP officers discovered 13 bundles containing a total of nearly 33 pounds of alleged methamphetamine and 51 packages containing a total of 158 pounds of alleged marijuana hidden within the vehicle. The combined estimated street value for the narcotics is $1.1 million. CBP officers seized the narcotics, vehicle and turned the driver over to Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents for further...

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Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez dies in Mexico City
Apr17

Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez dies in Mexico City

By NPR Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez, author of One Hundred Years of Solitude, has died in Mexico City. He was 87. The Associated Press says: “Garcia Marquez’s magical realist novels and short stories exposed tens of millions of readers to Latin America’s passion, superstition, violence and inequality. “Widely considered the most popular Spanish-language writer since Miguel de Cervantes in the 17th century, Garcia Marquez achieved literary celebrity that spawned comparisons to Mark Twain and Charles Dickens. “His flamboyant and melancholy works outsold everything published in Spanish except the Bible. The epic 1967 novel One Hundred Years of Solitude sold more than 50 million copies in more than 25 languages.” The Los Angeles Times says: “A cause of death was not immediately announced, but Garcia Marquez had been in failing health for some time. He was released from the hospital just over a week ago. “Garcia Marquez’s death represents the passing of one of the world’s greatest living authors, and the loss of a powerful public intellectual whose opinions on Cuba, military dictatorship and Latin American cultural autonomy made front-page news. “The news was met with an outpouring of grief and reverence for the writer known to his admirers simply as ‘Gabo,’ and who was often compared to Hispanic literature’s other titan, ‘Don Quixote’ author Miguel de Cervantes. More than any other author, Garcia Marquez fueled the post-World War II popularizing of Latin America literature known as the ‘Boom.’ ” NPR’s Mandalit Del Barco has a more detailed portrait of the author and his life here. In a statement, President Obama said of Garcia Marquez: “I once had the privilege to meet him in Mexico, where he presented me with an inscribed copy that I cherish to this day. “As a proud Colombian, a representative and voice for the people of the Americas, and as a master of the ‘magic realism’ genre, he has inspired so many others – sometimes even to pick up the pen themselves,” the president...

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CBP Arrest Fugitive Wanted  on Sexual Abuse of a Child Warrant
Mar31

CBP Arrest Fugitive Wanted on Sexual Abuse of a Child Warrant

LAREDO, TEXAS – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at the Laredo Port of Entry this weekend apprehended a man wanted in connection with an outstanding warrant regarding alleged child sexual abuse. “Any time CBP officers stop a fugitive wanted on outstanding warrants for alleged crimes of a sexual nature, especially those involving children, it underscores the border security aspect of our mission,” said Jose R. Uribe, Acting Port Director, Laredo. “By apprehending fugitives wanted for these types of crimes, we help keep our community safe.” The fugitive apprehension occurred on Sunday, Mar. 30, 2014 at the Lincoln-Juarez Bridge. A CBP officer at primary inspection referred bus passenger Maximo Gonzalez, a 59-year-old male U.S. citizen from Mt. Pleasant, Texas for a secondary examination. During the examination, CBP officers verified Gonzalez’s identity, citizenship and confirmed he was wanted in Mt. Pleasant, Texas on an outstanding state warrant for continuous sexual abuse of a child. After confirming the warrant was active, CBP officers transported Gonzalez to Webb County jail for adjudication of the...

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Three Ways to End Child Sex Trafficking Solutions are Within Our Grasp, Attorney Says
Mar11

Three Ways to End Child Sex Trafficking Solutions are Within Our Grasp, Attorney Says

Human trafficking is the world’s fastest growing criminal enterprise and is an estimated $32 billion-a-year global industry. Up to 27 million people around the world are held in some form of slavery, but last year only 46,500 of them were identified, according to the 2013 Trafficking in Persons Report issued by the U.S. State Department. “Identifying and rescuing child victims of sex trafficking is particularly difficult,” says practicing attorney Pamela Samuels Young, www.pamelasamuelsyoung.com, author of “Anybody’s Daughter,” a new legal thriller that sheds light on the growing problem of child sex trafficking in the United States. Traffickers prey on the most vulnerable children in our society, such as runaways or children in foster care, Young explains. These girls—often as young as 9 or 10—already have tragic lives. Nationally, 95 percent of teen girls arrested on prostitution charges were victims of sexual abuse earlier in their lives. “They’re easy prey for pimps because they’re desperately looking for someone to love and care for them,” Young says. So when a would-be pimp befriends them, lavishing them with attention, clothes, food and shelter, it doesn’t take long for a girl to fall in “love” with her “benefactor,’’ and comply when he asks her to help him make money. “The pimp alternates between making the girl believe she loves him, and physically and emotionally forcing her into prostitution,” Young says. “These girls are forced to turn 20 tricks a day, which brings in big money for the pimp. We’re seeing gangs abandon the drug trade and turn to sex trafficking because it’s far more lucrative and less likely to earn them any serious jail time.” At least 100,000 children in the United States are victims of commercial sexual exploitation, according to a report of the findings of a 2012 National Colloquium on the issue. What can we do to end child sex trafficking? Young offers these solutions. • Enact stiff penalties for traffickers and johns. For a long time, those who purchased sex did not face criminal prosecution, while those who sold it or promoted it did. While that is beginning to change, the punishment for johns is still no more than a slap on the wrist. As for the pimps, even if they are arrested, they’re often back on the street the next day while the girls remain in custody. “We need to enact severe criminal penalties for people who solicit children for sex as well as those who traffic in children. Significant jail time should be mandatory for both,” Young says. • Treat commercially sexually exploited children as victims, not criminals. Thanks to the growing global focus on human trafficking, law...

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